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Timeline: Institute of Ethnmusicology, Department of Music

1960

The first spring festival was held on May 8-22, 1960. At that time, it was called the "Festival of Oriental Music and the Related Arts." The spring concert series, now called the "Spring Festival of World Music and Jazz," continues to be an important annual tradition within the Department of Ethnomusicology because it provides an opportunity for students in performance ensembles to showcase what they have learned during the year.

1960-61

 

 

The curriculum for a specialization in ethnomusicology within the Music Department was introduced. Several new ethnomusicology courses appeared in the 1960-61 catalog for the first time: "Music of the Balkans" (Music 129), taught by Boris Kremenliev; "Pro-Seminar in Ethnomusicology" (Music 197), taught by Mantle Hood; "Seminar: Notation and Transcription in Ethnomusicology" (Music 253), taught by Mantle Hood; "Seminar: Field and Laboratory Methods in Ethnomusicology (Music 254), taught by Mantle Hood; "Seminar in Musical Instruments of the World" (Music 255), taught by Mantle Hood.

1961

 

 

 

1961

UCLA Chancellor Frankin D. Murphy annouced the establishment of the Institute of Ethnomusicology, with Mantle Hood as its Director. Hood became the leading force behind the Institute's success. From its founding to 1974, the Institute: 1) hosted a large number of internationally-known master musicians and instructors from different world traditions; 2) purchased an impressive collection of world musical instruments; 3) supported the collection of traditional sound recordings for what is now one of the largest sound archives in the U.S.; 4) supported scientific work in systematic musicology, particularly the development and use of the melograph, an automatic music writer, for musical transcription; and 5) supported the research work of ethnomusicology faculty by creating a publications program for the dissemination of their work.

The Ethnomusicology Archive was established. Mantle Hood asked Ann Briegleb Schuursma to serve as the first Archivist. Schuursma served as Archivist from 1961 until her retirement in 1984. For the first 40-year history of the Archive (1961-2001), click here.

1961-74

 

In addition to performance instructors (see below), the Music Department hired a number of roster faculty to teach ethnomusicology and systematic musicology courses: William Hutchinson (1961-90); David Morton (1962-85); J.H. Kwabena Nketia (1963 and 1968-83); Klaus Wachsmann (1963-68); Max Harrell (1965-83); Peter Crossley-Holland (1969-83); Abraham Schwadron (1969-87); Rodney Vlasak (1969-77); James Porter (1969-97); Jozef Pacholczyk (1970-74).

1961

 

The South Asia culture area was established. The earliest teacher of Indian music at UCLA was the late T. Viswanathan from South India, who taught flute and vocal music. From 1961 to 1966 Harihar Rao, a former student of Ravi Shankar, served as director of the Indian Studies Group. He also purchased many instruments (sitars and tablas) from India.

1961

The Japan culture area was established when the Music Department hired Suenobu Togi.

1963

 

The Africa culture areawas established when James S. Coleman, director of the UCLA African Studies Center, invited J.H. Kwabena Nketia to teach at UCLA during the summer of 1963. Nketia returned as a UCLA faculty member in the Music Department in 1968. From 1963 to 1968, Klaus Wachsmann taught courses in African music in the Music Department.

1963

The Anglo-American culture area was established when D.K. Wilgus was hired by the English and Music Departments. He worked in both departments from 1963 until he retired in 1989.

1964

The Near East culture area was established when Hormoz Farhat, who taught Persian music, was hired by the Music Department.

1964

The Publications Program was established when Mantle Hood published the documentary film Atumpan in 1964, and in 1966 the first volume of Selected Reports in Ethnomusicology was published. The Ethnomusicology at UCLA newsletter was first published in Fall, 1983.

1964

 

The "Development of Jazz" course, taught by Paul Tanner, first appeared in the catalog. Tanner taught at UCLA from 1958 to 1981. He was the first of many faculty members to teach in the area of Jazz Studies in the Music and Ethnomusicology Departments. For more information go to Paul Tanner Oral History or UCLA Jazz: The Early Years.

1964

 

Twelve ethnomusicology performance organizations  (Bali, Balkans, China, Ghana, Greece, India, Japan, Java, Mexico, Persia, Philippines, and Thailand) first appeared in the catalog as course offerings. Other performance ensembles (e.g., Korea, Mexico, Near East, African American, Afro-Cuban, Brazil, and Anglo-American) were added in later years.

1965

The China culture area was established when Tsun-Yuen Lui was hired by the Music Department. Mr. Lui worked for the department from 1965 until he retired in 1991.

1966-67

 

“American Folk and Popular Music” (Music 144), taught by Wilgus, first appeared in the catalog in 1966-67. William Carter taught Music 144 in 1976-77 and David Morton taught it in 1977-78. In 1978-79, the course title was changed to “American Popular Music” (Music 144) with Morton as the instructor. In 1989, the course number was changed to ESM 117 with the establishment of the Department. Since the sixties and seventies, several faculty members have taught courses in popular music

1966-67

 

The Mexico and Latin America culture area was established in 1966-67 when “Music of Latin America” (Music 131) first appeared in the catalog. In 1967-68, Robert Stevenson was listed as the instructor for Music 131. In 1968, Jesus Sanchez was hired by the Music Department to direct the mariachi ensemble, Uclatlan. In 1971-72, the course title for Music 131 was changed to “Music of Hispanic America” (Music 131AB).

1967

The Korea culture area was established when Danny Lee was hired in 1967 to teach the Music of Korea course, which he taught until 1997.

1967

The African American culture area was established with the hiring of Willie Ruff, who taught at UCLA from 1967 to 1971. The course,“The Afro-American Musical Heritage” (Music 154AB), first appeared in the catalog in 1970-71 with Willie Ruff listed as the instructor.

1968

UCLA hosted the Annual Meeting of the Society for Ethnomusicology, November 21-24, 1968. This was the first of several SEM annual meetings to take place at UCLA.

1974

The Institute was disestablished in 1974, the same year Mantle Hood left UCLA. The ethnomusicology program remained a degree program within the Department of Music. The Archive became part of the Department of Music.


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